My First Time Lapse


I’m starting to do more real estate videos. Not satisfied with run-of-the-mill videos, I recently invested quite a bit of money into equipment that will step up the production value. One of those items is anĀ intervalometer to help me do time lapse.

I did the short clip above by hand; meaning I did not have an intervalometer. I simply used the timer on my iPhone and a cable release to take the necessary exposures. After trying that, I knew I needed a remote timer to make it easier on me, so I went ahead and bought it.

There are a ton of tutorials on the web about time lapse so I won’t rehash here. Just know there is some math involved to figure out how many frames you need. I knew I wanted a 4-second clip and I’m recording at 24 frames per second. So I need 96 pictures to cover 4 seconds (4 x 24=96). I want to take a picture every 3 seconds to show the movement of the clouds. So I multiply 96 x 3=288. That’s how many seconds I have to shoot with a 3-second interval to get 96 frames. 288 divided by 60=4.8 or about 5 minutes. So for five minutes, I took a picture every 3 seconds and got 96 frames to cover 4 seconds of footage. In other words, you just saw five minutes fly by in 4 seconds.

Soon, I’ll post reviews on all the pieces of equipment I acquired including the intervalometer, so stay tuned for that.

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Time Lapse Photography


In my last post, I mentioned a relatively inexpensive program to produce slow motion DSLR videos.

Well, let’s speed things up a bit.

Andrew Reese took 1400 shots in 2.5 second intervals then converted each pair into black and white HDR shots for a total of about 700 images. Then he made this video at 12 frames per second:



Over at PetaPixel.com, I discovered more time-lapse videos taken with Canon DSLRs. The first is of San Francisco taken with a Canon 40D. Here’s the description from the PetaPixel site:

Photographer Simon Christen shot the various clips using a Canon 40D (10-22mm, 24-70mm, and 70-200mm) around the San Francisco Bay Area over the course of a year. His camera was always in manual mode, and he adjusted the settings as the light changed due to things like fog and clouds.”

I’ll share one more from Tokyo shot with a Canon 7D by Stefan Werc. I love the shots from the moving train!


On the PetaPixel site, under related posts, you can find many more time-lapse videos. If you’re really into it, then you’ll also love these over at TimeScapes.org.

Personally, I think these time-lapse videos are works of art. Interestingly, though, some people who commented on the PetaPixel site, feel that they lack originality; that they’re just pretty pictures with no story. What do you think?