Recent Acquisitions


Vide gear

 

In a recent blog post I mentioned that I recently invested in quite a bit of gear to start doing more real estate videos. I really want to increase the production value and make the videos cinematic. Here is some of the equipment I’ll be using:

 

1.) Westcott Spiderlite TD 6 Continuous Lighting Kit

2.)Manfrotto  535 Carbon Fiber Tripod with 502 Video Head

3.) Tether Tools Wallee iPad Connect

4.) Cinevate Atlas FLT 26 inch slider with vertical kit and counterbalance

5.) Manfrotto 494 mini ball head

6.) Rode Smart Lav

7.) Canon TC-80N3 Timer Remote

I plan to review each piece to let you know how it works and why I use it. So stay tuned for that.

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Behind the Scenes: Composing For Interior Photography


If you follow me on Facebook, you may have seen some of the behind-the-scenes shots I’ve posted of my camera and tripod positioned so I can get a good shot. In interior photography, the size of the room and layout of the furniture sometimes present challenges against the composition I want to achieve. Below are some of those shots and the end result.

tripod on table Living Room copy

BTS-2Living Room-1

photo (1) copyRVH_072_Master Bed 1-1 copy

Why My Next Camera Will Be Mirrorless Pt. II


Sony RX1

Sony RX1

So as the title implies, this is a follow-up to the “Why My Next Camera Will Be Mirrorless” post written in July of 2012. Back then, I hadn’t purchased the Canon 5D MKIII yet and Canon had not yet released its own mirrorless camera; and I had my eye on the Sony NEX-7 with its 24 megapixel, APS-C sensor. With interchangeable lenses, I was considering the Zeiss 24mm f/1.8 lens. Then everything changed when Sony announced the RX1.

First, let me say, that I as I indicated in the post, I did indeed get the 5D MKIII. I need it for my profession; shooting interiors. But I never got excited about it. It’s a tool that I need for work. Don’t get me wrong, it’s a great camera and I wouldn’t part with it…but it’s a tool none the less. The RX1 is the first camera in a long time that I can remember actually being excited about.

You may have heard by now that the RX1 is the world’s first full frame compact camera. That’s right, it packs a 24MP full frame sensor in a small body with a fixed 35mm f/2 lens. Just how small is it? Do a Google image search of “RX1” and you’ll see some images of it in people’s hands.

The reviews have been off the charts. Steve Huff did an extensive two-part review of the RX1 and calls it one of the best cameras ever. Additionally, you can read reviews at Pop-Photo with lab test results and it was rated right up there with the Nikon D800. Here’s another in-depth review calling the RX1 “the best lightweight digital camera I’ve ever put my hands on, and has become one of my favorite cameras ever. Period.”

Why am I so excited about this camera? As I mentioned in Part 1 of this post, I want a camera I can travel with that has the quality of a DSLR but not the size and weight. I have some trips planned this year, including a 2-week visit to Italy in the Spring. I really don’t want to lug around my MKIII and worry about it getting damaged, lost or stolen. Yes, I have insurance, but if something happens to it, I can’t go right back to work when I return from the trip. It’s my bread and butter. The iPhone and compacts just don’t have large enough sensors to produce quality results. That’s why I was looking at the NEX-7.

I do have a few concerns; not the least of which is the $2800 price tag. I could save money and get an NEX (I’ve read the NEX-6 is slightly better than the 7). OR, I could just buy a lens; perhaps a 24-105 or 35mm for my Canon. But I don’t think I would get the same results from the NEX and the second option still has me travelling with a big DSLR.

There is no viewfinder; you compose images from the LCD screen. You can buy an optical or electronic viewfinder, but those are really expensive. Even the lens hood is an optional and expensive accessory.

I also worry about the fixed 35mm lens. Will I be restricted? It’s a classic travel photography focal length; just not one I am used to.

Having said all that, I am not saying YOU need to go out and buy an RX1. But it occurred to me that if someone asked me what camera they should buy, I would tell them to get a mirrorless camera. The average person thinks they need a DSLR, but that’s just not true anymore. I would point them to the popular Olympus OMD-5 ranked by readers of Digital Photography Review as the 2012 Camera of the Year; ahead of the MKIII and D800! I would tell them about the new line of Fuji X-series cameras. I would still recommend Sony’s NEX line. Yes, Nikon has a line but it’s been met with lukewarm reception; and Canon’s foray into the mirrorless party with the EOS-M is likewise less than inspiring. Speaking of mirrorless party, check out this video which kind of sums it up:

There will always be a need for DSLRs among professionals. But the parent who wants to take pictures of their kids or a tourist on vacation doesn’t really need one. I think mirrorless cameras fill the space between the cell phone Instagramer and the pro shooter. Someone who just wants a good camera without the size, weight and price (the RX1 excluded on that count) of a DSLR.

Why My Next Camera Will be Mirrorless: Part 1


Sony NEX-7

Sony NEX-7

I’ll admit I was a little late to the mirrorless party. I’d heard about Micro 4/3rds, EVIL, MILC, etc. and I was just too busy or too arrogant to pay attention. I figured anything with a small sensor wasn’t worth my time. In truth, my next camera will be the Canon 5D MKIII; I still need the full frame capabilities for my profession.

My interest in mirrorless cameras came from a desire for a system I can use for my personal use. I hate lugging around a big DSLR when traveling and a point-and-shoot or iPhone just doesn’t get me the quality I need. Enter mirrorless cameras: small form factor with a sensor larger than point-and shoots; in some cases just as large as a DSLR.

In case you’re new to this too, let me go over a few things. First, terminology:

  • Micro 4/3 (four-thirds) refers to the size of the sensor. Check out “Size Matters in Photography” for an explanation on sensor sizes.
  • “EVIL” stands for “Electronic Viewfinder Interchangeable Lens”. Most mirrorless cameras do not have an optical viewfinder, but an electronic one instead.
  • MILC stand for “Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera”.

In case you don’t know how a DSLR works, check out the diagram below:

DSLR Cross Section

Image from Vimeo Video School

When you look through the viewfinder, you can see through the lens because light bounces off a mirror which gets reflected off a prism and then through the viewfinder. When you click the shutter, the mirror flips up and light hits the sensor directly. This is why your viewfinder goes black when you press the shutter.

The prism inside a DSLR is also what makes it so bulky. The mirror is, of course, a moving part which fails after time. That’s why cameras are rated at certain “shutter actuations” or the number of shots you can take. Most are in the 50,000 to 150,000 range. Some high-end DSLRs are rated at 200,000 actuations.

So naturally, a mirrorless camera does not have a mirror or a prism which allows for a more compact body. It also means super fast frames per second, because there is no mirror that needs to flip up and reset before the next shot.

As I mentioned before, I am looking for something I can travel with that’s small enough to pack but that has DSLR-like quality. The guy who created the Instapaper App recently blogged about transitioning from DSLRs to an iPhone. When he wanted high-resolution images for his retina display he found the iPhone images just were not good enough. My first reaction was “did you really think the tiny sensor in an iPhone would give you quality good enough for a retina display?” My thoughts were echoed in this Cult of Mac article. But I also felt empathy.

On a recent trip to St. Thomas I decided not to bring my DSLR. I took pictures with my iPhone primarily so I could quickly share photos on Facebook. I also used a Canon Powershot 310HS when I wanted a little better quality. Below is an image from my iPhone 4S:

Charlotte Amalie Harbor

iPhone 4S:  f/2.4, 1/15, ISO 800.

I find the noise from the iPhone to be unacceptable, even in broad daylight at ISO 64.

St. John

iPhone 4S:  f/2.4, 1/3000, ISO 64

Look at all the noise in the sky. It’s only slightly better on the Powershot (granted it was at ISO 1600).

St. Thomas

Powershot 310HS:  f/3.2, 1/8, ISO 1600

It all has to do with the size of the sensor. A bigger sensor, among other things, will allow for less noise (up to a point). The Sony NEX-7 (pictured at the top of this post) has a 24-megapixel APS-C sized sensor; the same size found on most consumer Canon and Nikon DSLRs.

I really believe we are at a point where the market is going in three directions: One is DSLRs, the other is small cameras with larger sensors. Everything else is taken by camera phones because they are so accessible. But anyone who wants quality photos will fall in one or both of the other camps. Check out this blog post about a CNBC reporter forecasting the death of point-and-shoots.

The New York Times recently reviewed the new Sony RX100 and David Pouge raved about the 1-inch sensor on a tiny body. Some of the comments and even a blog attacked him for his praise; but they miss the point. What Pouge is saying is that a sensor that big on a camera small enough to fit in your pocket is going to rival other point-and-shoots with smaller sensors.

Now, mind you, you can’t fit most mirrorless cameras in your pocket due to the size of the lenses. But that’s something I like: big sensor, big lens, small body. Small and light enough for me to pack on a trip.

I credit well-known photographer Trey Ratcliff for enlightening me to the possibilities of mirrorless cameras. He makes a very good case in his “DLSRs Are a Dying Breed” blog post. Definitely worth a read.

You have a lot of choices when it comes to mirrorless cameras; from Olympus to Sony and even Nikon. Fuji made a big splash with its X100 and X10. Now, Canon is rumored to introduce a mirrorless later this month. Some have interchangeable lenses and others do not. The sensor sizes also vary, so you’ll have to do some research.

For a good primer on mirrorless cameras, check out this guide by Neo Camera.

So if you’re looking for a camera that’s small enough to carry around but will still deliver DSLR-like quality, I suggest you take a look at mirrorless cameras. It’s what I’ll be carrying on my next trip.

You can read Part 2 of this blog by clicking here

Canon 5D MKII Price Drop Begins


Canon 5D MKII

Let the price drop begin. When Canon announced the 5D MKIII two days ago, I was expecting the price of the MKII to drop in the coming weeks (the MKIII is expected to begin shipping in late March). I had no idea how soon the price would drop.

I tracked price fluctuations last year; from a hike to about $2,700 after the Japan earthquake to a low of about $2,100 for the Christmas shopping season. It stabilized to the usual $2,500 after the holidays.

Now it’s down to $2,200 on Amazon. [UPDATE 3/5/12: Another $50 drop. It’s down to $2,149.] How low will it go? We’ll see in the next few weeks. So if you’ve been eyeing a full frame camera, you might save some money by opting for the MKII over the newer MKIII.

Is the MKIII worth the extra $1,300? I did a comparison using SnapSort and found mostly minor differences.

  • A screen that is .2-inches larger with better resolution. The image on the screen does not reflect what you’ll see on your computer or print.
  • 6 frames per second vs. 3.9. If you don’t shoot action, then this won’t matter to you.
  • 22.1 megapixels vs. 21. ‘Nuff said.

The differences that might sway me are:

  • ISO 25,600 vs. 6,400
  • 100% viewfinder coverage vs. 98%. As an interior photographer, this is actually a big deal for me

Other features that might interest you:

  • More focus points and more cross type focus points
  • In camera HDR
  • Silent mode for video recording

The question is: is that worth the extra money? Hit me up in the comments with your thoughts. If the MKII drops to $2,000 would you get it instead of the MKIII or is the MKIII clearly superior?

“Act of Valor” Shot with Canon 5D MKII


A few months ago I heard about an upcoming movie that was shot mostly with the Canon 5D MKII. The movie is about the Navy SEALS and the characters are portrayed by real SEALs. I grew up watching war movies and I’m a huge military history buff. So while this type of film never gets much commercial success, the recent exploits of the SEALs might give this film a boost. With the movie coming out on the 24th, I’m starting to see more buzz on the web about it.

If you watch the YouTube clip carefully, you’ll catch some glimpses of the 5D rig beginning at :36 seconds, again at :38 and check out that telephoto lens at :43. Is that the 800mm?!

I knew an episode of “House” was shot with the Mark II and a lot of independent filmmakers are using it. But this is the first I’ve heard of a feature film shot with a DSLR.

Holiday Gifts for Photographers 2011


Christmas Tree Ornament

I like to live in a state of denial. Florida doesn’t really have “seasons”, but when the weather got cooler and I had to start raking my front yard, I had to admit it was Fall (or at least Fall-ish). I’m still not used to the time change and despite the commercials, ads and displays, I don’t want to think about Christmas just yet. But alas time marches on without me. So with that, I want to start sharing some gift ideas for photographers in case you’re the type that likes to wrap presents before you dress your turkey.

Let’s begin with Adorama’s “100 Photo-tastic Gifts for under $100.” Considering most photography gear is in the hundreds or thousands of dollars, this is a good list of stuff that is actually useful; from camera bags and light modifiers, to memory, software and books.

I am a dork. (You see how I moved past denial and straight into acceptance?) My mouse pad has a camera dial on it and I have two Canon lens mugs. I also like to wear photography-related t-shirts. The best place to find them is over at Cafe Press. They’re having a sale right now, so most shirts will run you in the $23 range. Here’s a tip: don’t pay extra for faster shipping; I got my most recent order much faster than anticipated. Try coupon code “GLOW” for an extra 15% off.

Since I mentioned mouse pads, there’s one for Nikon shooters here; and more designs here.

UPDATE 11/29/11:  I just ran across this link from the LensPro To Go blog. I like how they divide the categories based on price range. Check out the $100-$200 category. The Steadicam Smoothee is an interesting item. A DSLR steadicam will run you about 800-bucks! Also, check out the Spider Holster which I mentioned in a past blog post.

Lastly, check out the posts I wrote last year in case you missed them:

Gift Ideas for Photographers

Stocking Stuffers For Your Favorite Photographers

That’s it for now. As the holiday’s get closer and retailers announce deals, I’ll try to post them. If you noticed, I’m looking for items that won’t break the bank; because let’s face it, no one in my family is going to get me the $2,400 5D MKII…which is why I’m giving them socks.